Transfusion #6

Today is our baby Callum’s due date! It is hard to believe he is almost six weeks old on his due date.

Yesterday, Callum had his sixth blood transfusion (third post birth transfusion.) His hematocrit had held steady at about 29 the past few weeks but this week it suddenly dropped to 23. He wasn’t eating well and was more irritable than usual so his hematologist and I thought it was best to go ahead and transfuse. The doctors and nurses at Children’s of Alabama have been so wonderful, just like they were with Nora a couple years ago. They called IV therapy to insert Callum’s IV since he is so tiny and they hit his vein on the first try. They also had to double check his blood type since it had changed since birth. He was born O- because he was 100% donor blood at birth, but since then he has started making his own blood so yesterday when they tested him again, his blood type was O+. During the blood transfusion I was able to breastfeed Callum (some hospitals don’t allow baby to eat at all until the transfusion is finished) and I had a comfortable recliner to sit and hold him in the whole time. He handled it really well and slept in my arms or nursed throughout the transfusion. I think he was just happy to have a whole day of Mommy’s complete attention for once.

We will do blood work again in about two weeks to see how Callum is doing. They tested Callum’s blood yesterday to see if he still had some of my antibodies circulating in his system and he does, which means the new kell positive blood he is making now will be attacked by my antibodies. Hopefully soon he will be antibody free and he will be making all of his own blood with no further need for transfusions (like Nora.) Ok, I can barely keep my eyes open so I’m off to bed!


His Name

Several people have asked us how we came up with the name Callum and others have asked why he has two middle names. Josh and I really struggled to come up with Callum’s name since we had already named seven babies before him (Liam Joshua, Asher Caleb, Lucy Dair, Jude, Pax, Scarlet Mae and Nora Juliet.) We are thankful that we found the perfect name for him and we won’t be naming any more babies after this!

Callum is pronounced “Cal” like in California and “um” like in umbrella. We have been surprised to hear lots of variations on the pronunciation (I guess since most people haven’t heard the name much.) We’ve heard “Caylum” and “Collum” a lot. The name Callum is Scottish, and it means “Peace/Dove.” God truly has brought us so much peace through this boy and He blessed me with a supernatural peace throughout my stressful pregnancy. Even while being wheeled into the operating room for a completely unexpected c-section all by myself with a premature baby who was showing signs of distress, I felt overcome by peace and excitement. I pray that in this world of suffering and chaos, Callum will know the deep, resounding peace of Jesus. I pray that God uses Callum’s life to bring peace and comfort to others.

Callum’s middle name, Joseph, means “God has added” which is so perfect. We never thought we would have any more babies after Lucy died, then we were blessed with Nora and even though we wanted more than three kids, we thought we had to stop after having our rainbow baby. God has added yet another beautiful little person to our family and we are amazed at His goodness to us. God has added, He hasn’t replaced Lucy or taken away our grief, but He has added joy, peace and fulfillment to all of our loss through this sweet boy. Joseph is also Dr. Moise’s middle name and we know that Callum wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for Dr. Moise. Dr. Moise pioneered the use of plasmapheresis and IVIG for women with extreme alloimmunization during pregnancy (like me.) Callum would not have survived without plasmapheresis and IVIG treatments that kept him alive while he grew big enough for intrauterine blood transfusions. Dr. Moise also helped train Dr. Trevett and is part of the reason why Dr. Trevett is such an amazing physician. Dr. Moise collaborated with Dr. Trevett (all the way from Houston) for my care during my pregnancy with Callum and we are so grateful for his help.

Callum’s other middle name, Thomas, is after Dr. Thomas Trevett, who worked so hard to get Callum here alive.

It is rare to find a physician who is not only skilled at what he does but is also humble, generous and compassionate like Dr. Trevett. He always treated me with kindness and respect, even when I questioned him or when my anxiety bordered on controlling. Dr. Trevett was so cautious with our son’s life. He protected Callum when he was in his most vulnerable and helpless state, and for that we will forever be grateful. I would love for Callum to grow up to be a great man like Dr. Trevett.

A few people have mentioned to us that Dr. Moise and Dr. Trevett probably feel honored to have a baby named after them, but really we are the ones who feel honored to have these men in our lives. We feel honored that Dr. Trevett and Dr. Moise played such an important part in the life of our son and Callum gets to grow up admiring them.

So, that is how our Callum Joseph Thomas was named and he has a lot to live up to and we have so much to be thankful for.




We brought our beautiful healthy boy home from the NICU a few days ago and it has been an amazing, exhausting whirlwind ever since. Callum’s doctor did a couple more x-rays and lots of blood work after his bloody diaper and all of it came back clear so she was able to rule out the transfusion related gut injury/NEC that we had feared. He has a dairy allergy instead so I’ve cut out all dairy from my diet and he’s on a dairy free formula (with occasional breastfeeding) until all of the dairy is out of my system (it usually takes a few weeks.) Then we will transition back to breastfeeding only. After Cal had his second post birth blood transfusion his oxygen was so much better (no more desats) and he basically took all of his feedings by mouth from that point on. It felt unreal when they told me I could take him home. I showed up at the NICU to get him and his tiny little body was completely wire free for the first time since he was born!


The hospital has a rule that all babies being discharged from the NICU must be wheeled out of the hospital in their mother’s arms, which felt kind of ridiculous since I had been walking back and forth from the Ronald McDonald House to the hospital parking deck to the NICU and back for weeks. It felt so surreal and wonderful though, to be leaving the hospital with my healthy baby boy in my arms.


We are overcome with gratitude to God for giving us this miracle and completing our family. Callum was His idea in the first place…a redemptive gift that I do not deserve. I get teary when I think back to the beginning of this year when Josh and I were trying to decide if we were brave enough to try for one last baby and God whispered, “Let me bless you.” over and over again. He encouraged us to be courageous and to trust Him. He had this sweet baby boy in mind and I’m so glad we took that leap. All of the fear and the physical pain and exhaustion and inconvenience was so, so worth it. Watching Nora meet her baby brother for the first time was one of the happiest, most beautiful moments of my life. We grieve the loss of her big sister daily. We ache for the friendship that was lost for Nora when Lucy died. She should have a sister two years older than her. It has been so sad to watch Nora play on the sidelines while her brothers play together every day in their own world that she isn’t really a part of. Josh and I prayed so many times for God to give Nora a sibling friend of her own and now he is here! Callum and Nora are almost exactly the same age distance apart as Liam and Asher and Lucy and Nora. Thank you, Lord, for hearing our pleas and for giving Nora her very own sibling friend.


Seeing the relief on Liam and Asher’s faces when they are with Callum is so incredibly gratifying.


I’m pretty sure Callum has a different take on things since he is constantly passed around, kissed, patted, hugged and manhandled by his older siblings. I think he longs for his peaceful NICU days of the past.


Callum had his first follow up appointment with his pediatric hematologist in Birmingham a couple of days ago and it went really well. He literally slept through his blood draw and his numbers looked ok. His hematocrit was 30 and hemoglobin was 10 and retic had gone up to 1. I really liked his hematologist too. I think Cal will need at least one more blood transfusion before his body is making enough blood on its own, but maybe not. He will have weekly blood draws at the hematologist until he is cleared of his HDN. Thank you all for your support and prayers along the way. We don’t know how we could have done it without you all.


Still in the NICU

Well, Callum definitely won’t be going home this weekend. He has had a few setbacks so I’m trying to readjust my timeline and my expectations on when we can bring home our baby. His hematocrit dropped to 25, which isn’t too bad (they usually transfuse between 22-24) but he wasn’t feeding well, he was having some oxygen desats and his retic was still super low (meaning he isn’t making his own blood yet) so they decided to go ahead and do the blood transfusion. They put an IV in his foot which made me so sad because it looked really painful. Since it took a while for the blood to be available I went back to the RMH to sleep and when I came back in the morning he had an IV in his hand because the foot IV didn’t work. He had just finished having his blood transfusion when I got there and his skin looked so pink and healthy.


He was awake and hungry so I breastfed him and he took a whole feeding without falling asleep, which is awesome! A few minutes later I heard him filling up his diaper so I decided to change him. When I opened up his diaper there was quite a bit of blood mixed in with the poop. The doctor came to look at it and she said he could either have a dairy allergy or he could have something called Transfusion Related Gut Injury (TRAGI) which can sometimes happen in micro-preemies who have blood transfusions. He’s definitely not a micro-preemie so we are hoping it is just a dairy allergy. The timing, though, suggests that it might have something to do with the blood transfusion. The doctor is x-raying his abdomen right now to try to get answers and I’m cutting all dairy out of my diet just in case. They are putting him on gut rest until they can figure out what is going on. Callum’s ferritin (iron) levels are really high on top of all of this. Before the blood transfusion his ferritin level was 1,216 and the normal range is 25-250. Since he was given adult donor blood which has high levels of iron in it, his levels are probably much higher now. They are running liver function tests to see if his liver is being affected by all of this extra iron in his body.

It is hard not knowing how much longer we have to live here in Atlanta separated from our family and our normal life and our sweet baby Callum. And can I just say how absolutely unnatural and weird it is to have a NICU baby in the first place? It’s unnatural to give birth and then never touch or hold or even see the baby for hours after that. It feels wrong for my baby to go through painful procedures without me there with him to comfort him. I show up and he’s suddenly got an IV or he’s had a vaccination, etc. and I wasn’t there to hold him when he cried. It’s completely unnatural to ask a stranger if I can please hold my baby or change his diaper or feed him. I’m his mother. I should be the one giving permission to others if they want to handle my baby. Nora still hasn’t even met Callum and Josh has seen him for maybe a couple hours in the past two weeks. All of this feels off but thank goodness it is temporary. Part of me feels incredibly privileged to even have a baby in the NICU. The one and only dream I ever had of Lucy after she died was of her in the NICU. I was going to visit her and I walked into the hospital, up the elevator to the next floor and down a long hallway to my baby Lucy’s crib. She was so sweet with chubby cheeks and brown hair and oh, I loved her so much. I was so happy to be with her in that sunny little room. Then I woke up to my nightmare…swollen, milk filled breasts and empty arms and a permanently mutilated heart. I was gutted. I begged God not to ever, ever let me dream about her again because I couldn’t stand waking up to my life. I will just wait until heaven. Thankfully He heard my pleas and hasn’t ever given me a dream about Lucy again. It would be too painful. But after I had that dream I struggled any time I heard a NICU mom complain about her living baby who was still in the NICU. I envied her. Now I get to be one of those moms with a living baby in the NICU and I am so, so grateful (and yes, I still complain about the hard stuff.) Even though it is inconvenient, it is stressful, it is exhausting and it feels unnatural, I know we are very blessed to be in this situation. Do you know what is truly unnatural? A mama saying goodbye to her baby for good. A mama living the rest of her life without her child.

So, yes, it is hard and we are exhausted but we are so thankful.


Please continue to pray for our baby Callum to get over whatever is hurting his belly, to get better at his feedings and for his blood levels to normalize. We appreciate all of you so much!

Update on Callum

Today our baby Callum is two weeks old and he is doing well in the NICU here in Atlanta. My mom and Nora and I have been staying at the Ronald McDonald House half a mile from the hospital and they have been amazing. I really don’t know what we would do without the RMH. Callum lost some weight after he was born but has now surpassed his birth weight. He is really good at breastfeeding and taking a bottle but he often falls asleep before the feeding is finished so he still depends on his feeding tube some for nutrition. Callum’s bilirubin hasn’t been checked in a week and his hematocrit was last checked a couple days ago so I have been pushing for them to recheck those levels soon. A few of his doctors and nurses have been very nonchalant about his HDN (hemolytic disease of the newborn.) Occasionally I have to remind them that this isn’t typical preemie jaundice or normal iron deficiency anemia. It can be a very sneaky and dangerous disorder if not followed closely. I know babies who have died from HDN and many others who have permanent brain damage because their HDN was not treated appropriately after birth. Anyway, I’m hoping that the doctor will recheck Callum’s bilirubin tomorrow and his hematocrit soon. I really wanted them checked today but the doctor didn’t want to for some reason. The doctor feels pretty sure that Callum won’t need another blood transfusion but I think he will need one by the end of the week and probably at least one more in a few weeks. His retic is still basically 0 (I think it was 0.1 the last time they checked) and his hematocrit was 26 a couple days ago. They said they would transfuse when his levels got to 22-24 and since his retic shows us that he isn’t making his own red blood cells yet, we can be fairly certain that he will need a transfusion soon.

We have been working through the checklist we were given of things to complete before Callum can be discharged from the NICU (CPR class, follow up pediatric hematologist appointment scheduled, etc.) The doctors and nurses are hopeful that he might be able to come home by this weekend! Callum will be doing his carseat test tomorrow to see if he can handle sitting in a carseat for an hour and a half without struggling to keep his oxygen up. We are so thankful that he is doing well and getting close to coming home! It will feel so good to have our family all together again. I miss Josh and the boys so much. Nora still hasn’t been able to meet Callum since siblings age three and under are not allowed into the NICU. I cannot wait for her to meet him. She is going to be obsessed with her baby brother.

I am still working on Callum’s birth story so hopefully I can finish that soon! Here are a few pictures of our baby Callum from the past week:



Callum Joseph Thomas Weathersby

Surprise! Our miracle baby is here. Callum Joseph Thomas was born exactly one week ago at 34 weeks and 4 days via emergency c-section. He weighed 6lbs 6oz and was 18.5 inches long. I went in for my last IUT and ended up having a baby instead! This week has been an absolute blur and I am just now able to sit down at a computer to quickly update everyone. Baby Cal needed some breathing assistance at first but is now breathing on his own and is doing great in the NICU. I just moved into the Ronald McDonald House in Atlanta to be close to Callum until he’s discharged. I will write all about Callum’s birth story in my next blog post but for now, I’ll leave you with a few pictures of our sweet boy. Thank you all for praying for us! We are so thankful that our baby is here alive and well.

My first quick look at Callum before he was whisked away to the NICU

Finally able to get on my feet 12 hours after the c-section and go see Callum in the NICU.

Holding Mommy and Daddy’s fingers

Daddy’s first time holding Cal

My first time holding Callum

Most of the pictures are blurry because we had to keep our phones in a ziplock bag while in the NICU so the pictures were taken through the plastic.

Right after he was moved up to the “growers and feeders” floor of the NICU for less critical babies.



IUT #3

Baby boy is still doing great and handled his third IUT like a pro. My third IUT was a little bit more dramatic than the others but in the end everything was fine. We found out that I did develop a second antibody and it’s called anti-Kidd (jkb) antibody. This makes it more difficult to find blood for me since they now have to match donor blood with both of these antibodies. The blood bank worked all last weekend trying to find donor blood that matched mine and finally called Dr Trevett the night before the transfusion to tell him they got it! Well, the next morning I arrived at 5:30 am for the IUT and started getting ready for the procedure. Here I am with my GIANT belly at 32 weeks and 2 days:


Dr Trevett came in with a really frustrated look on his face. He said after all that work to find the right blood, the courier had forgotten to drive it to the hospital so there was no blood for the baby. This meant that we would miss our 7:00 time slot in the operating room. The courier was doing his best to get the blood to the hospital so all we could do was wait. There is a 24 hour time limit for when you can safely use the donor blood after collecting it, so the clock was ticking. It was stressful to wait and not know if the blood would get there in time. The hours leading up to an IUT are difficult anyway because it is a somewhat dangerous procedure and I never know how it’s going to go. Since I had a bad experience with my very first IUT ever in Alabama, it is often hard to feel hopeful. I never felt Lucy move again after her IUT and the doctors would not scan her again for a week. Lots of fears go through my mind before every IUT. Is baby’s heart rate going to plummet when they stick the needle into the cord? Is he going to develop a blood clot? Will they have to do an emergency c-section in the middle of the procedure? Would they get him out in time? There are so many what-ifs so it was difficult to have added stress during that time. I got a sweet text from another mom who has been through several IUTS who I helped through her own kell pregnancy. She shared a verse with me and encouraged me. I knew many of you were praying for us and that gave me strength. We finally were told that the blood had arrived and we had an OR room booked for 12:00. The hours ticked by and finally a little after 12:00 Dr Trevett walked in looking super frustrated again (poor guy had a long day!) He said there had been two emergency crash c-sections and we now did not have an operating room available but the 24 hour window to use the donor blood was about to close. Our only safe option was to do the IUT in an ultrasound room, which would mean I couldn’t have the sedative/pain medication for the procedure since we weren’t in the OR. It also meant if baby went into distress they couldn’t deliver right there, they would have to move me up to a different floor to an operating room before getting the baby out. The other choice was to let the blood expire while we waited for an OR to open up, then the blood bank would have to search for more donor blood that matched my antibodies. It could take days to get the blood and in the meantime baby would be getting more and more anemic, which would obviously be very dangerous. I agreed with Dr Trevett that we just needed to go ahead with the procedure in the ultrasound room so baby could get the blood he needed.

I really struggled with my anxiety at that point but two verses came to mind that helped. The verse my friend had shared with me earlier that day:

Do not be anxious about anything but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus. Philippians 4:6,7

And this simple verse that I love:

For He Himself is our peace. Ephesians 2:14

I made a conscious effort not to focus on the fear or the list of things that could go wrong and instead to find things I was thankful for. “Thank you Lord that I’m not in Houston trying to get an intrauterine blood transfusion in the middle of a disaster. Thank you for Dr Trevett and his patience, his kindness and his competence. Thank you for getting my son all the way to 32 weeks alive. Thank you for another chance to trust you in a difficult situation.” These small offerings of thanks brought me great comfort. I also thought of the other verse I mentioned, “He Himself is our peace. He is my peace. He’s bigger than the situation and the fear and the risks. He is my peace and He’s right here with me.” These thoughts calmed me, although they didn’t calm the contractions that started coming more frequently as I was moved into the ultrasound room for the procedure. The contractions kept coming throughout the procedure, which was really annoying and painful (having a long needle going through your uterus during a contraction is not something you want to feel.) Thankfully Dr Trevett and Dr Gomez, who was assisting, were very careful and patient working to get the blood into baby’s umbilical vein through all the contractions. Baby’s starting hematocrit was 24 and ending hematocrit was about 43. Baby handled the procedure well. Dr Trevett decided that he didn’t want to risk going in a second time to do the IPT (put extra blood into baby’s belly) since I was having regular contractions. I was thankful again for his caution and unwillingness to take extra risks when it isn’t absolutely necessary.

After the IUT, Dr Trevett wanted to monitor the baby and me for several hours and my contractions got closer together, although they weren’t changing my cervix at all or starting actual preterm labor. Dr Trevett had me stay overnight and they monitored baby’s heartbeat and my contractions all night long just to be safe. Since Josh had to work and couldn’t be there, my mom and Nora had come with me to Atlanta for the IUT. Nora brought so much joy to my hospital room while we passed the time on the monitor.


Love pats for baby brother.


And here’s Nora laughing at nothing:

The baby looked good all night long and my contractions eventually subsided so we were discharged from the hospital in the morning. Since Dr Trevett didn’t do the IPT we can only wait about two weeks until the next IUT and we will probably have to deliver a week earlier than we hoped. The next (and last!) IUT will be Tuesday, September 12th when I am 34 weeks and 3 days. Then, depending on how that IUT goes we will deliver two or three weeks after that at 36/37 weeks. I cannot wait to meet my son!

I had my appointment with the MFMs at UAB Hospital this past week and to be honest, I left feeling very discouraged and depressed. I’m feeling a bit better now and I’m working on the blog post to share how it went with everybody so hopefully I can post that soon. We appreciate all of your prayers and encouragement. They mean more than you know!